DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY

Year 7

Pupils in Year 7 receive one hour of technology per week. They will fulfil a project in product design and in food technology.

Through these two areas we aim to:

  1. Enhance design and development skills through a variety of techniques.

  2. Develop knowledge and experience of using computer aided design and manufacturing.

  3. Embed understanding of what a healthy diet looks like.

  4. Learn how to prepare and cook a variety of dishes that meet the criteria for healthy eating.

  5. Develop practical skills in both the food technology environment and in the workshop.

  6. Understand properties and functions of a variety of materials and ingredients.

  7. Learn how to produce a quality product.

Pupils can attend an extracurricular STEM club which is run jointly by a number of departments.

Pupils are asked to bring in ingredients required for practical lessons. Teachers will give pupils a list of what is required. Pupils who do not bring in the ingredients requested may be set alternative theory work to complete while the class carry out the practical work set.

Year 8

Pupils in Year 8 receive two hours of technology per week. They will fulfil a project in product design, textiles and in food technology. Through these subject areas, we will aim to:

  1. Enhance design and development skills through a range of techniques and modelling.

  2. Enhance knowledge and experience of using CAD/CAM.

  3. Develop understanding of choosing foods for a healthy diet.

  4. Learn how to select, prepare and cook a variety of dishes, justifying that they meet the criteria for healthy eating.

  5. Develop accuracy while using a range of tools and equipment in the food technology environment, textiles studio and in the workshop.

  6. Compare properties and functions of a variety of materials and ingredients.

  7. Evaluate the quality of products during the design and making stages to identify improvements.

Pupils can attend an extracurricular STEM club which is run jointly by a number of departments.

Pupils are asked to pay in advance for their ingredients for food technology lessons, which the school will then order ready for lessons. This request will be via a letter and payments should be made to the school reception.

ENGINEERING

Qualification: BTEC Tech Award in Engineering

This is an option subject. It is made up of 40% exam, which includes practical tasks, and 60% investigation and assignment.

Students will develop skills and engineering knowledge including:

  • How to develop a product.

  • Properties of metals and plastics.

  • How to develop a product specification.

  • Electronic circuits and systems.

Who is the qualification for?

Learners who wish to gain technical skills through vocational contexts by studying mechanical, electrical/electronic and engineering design. 

 

What does the qualification cover?

Learners develop engineering-specific knowledge and skills in a practical learning environment. The main focus is on four areas of equal importance,

which cover the:

• development of key engineering practical and technical skills, such as research, observation, measurement, making, using computer-aided design (CAD) and disassembly

• knowledge of key engineering sectors (mechanical, electrical/electronic and engineering design) and the interrelation of each in industry

• knowledge of the stages involved in planning and implementing an engineering project

• knowledge and skills involved in the investigation of solutions to engineering problems in response to a given brief.

 

This Award complements the learning in other courses such as GCSE Design and Technology by broadening the application of design and make tasks, working with an engineering brief, testing and evaluation.

 

Grading

Students will be graded at Level 1 Pass, Merit or Distinction; or Level 2 Pass, Merit, Distinction or Distinction*.

DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY

Qualification: AQA GCSE Design and Technology (8552)

This subject is made up of 50% exam and 50% non-exam assessment (NEA).

Year 9/10

Unit 1 – Exam: Written Paper. Worth 50% of the grade and lasts for 2 hours.

The exam will be made up as follows:

  • Section A – Core technical principles (20 marks)

    • A mixture of multiple choice and short answer questions assessing a breadth of technical knowledge and understanding.

  • Section B – Specialist technical principles (30 marks)

    • Several short answer questions (2–5 marks) and one extended response to assess a more in depth knowledge of technical principles.

  • Section C – Designing and making principles (50 marks)

    • A mixture of short answer and extended response questions.

Year 11

Unit 2 – Non Exam Assessment (NEA): Design and Make Task. Worth 50% of the grade and lasts for 30-35 hours of supervised time.

The NEA will be made up as follows:

  • Substantial design and make task

    • Identifying and investigating design possibilities

    • Producing a design brief and specification

    • Generating design ideas

    • Developing design ideas (including modelling)

    • Manufacture of design ideas

    • Analysing and evaluating

  • The task will be released to schools on 1 June in the year before the submission of the NEA.

  • Students will produce a prototype and a portfolio of evidence.

  • Work will be marked by teachers and moderated by the exam board.

Grading

Students will be graded from 9-1.

TEXTILES

Qualification: AQA GCSE Art and Design (Textile Design) (8204)

Made up of 60% portfolio and 40% externally set assessment over 10 hours of supervised time.

Textile design is the creation of designs and products for woven, knitted, stitched, printed or decorative textiles that might have a functional or non-functional purpose.

Areas of study

In Component 1 and Component 2 students are required to work in one or more area(s) of textile design, such as those listed below:

  • art textiles

  • fashion design and illustration

  • costume design

  • constructed textiles

  • printed and dyed textiles

  • surface pattern

  • stitched and/or embellished textiles

  • soft furnishings and/or textiles for interiors

  • digital textiles

  • installed textiles

They may explore overlapping areas and combinations of areas.

Knowledge, understanding and skills

Students must develop and apply the knowledge, understanding and skills to realise personal intentions relevant to textile design and their selected area(s) of study.

The following aspects of knowledge, understanding and skills are defined in further detail to ensure students’ work is clearly focused and relevant to textile design.

Knowledge and understanding

The way sources inspire the development of ideas, relevant to textile design including:

  • how sources relate to cultural, social, historical, contemporary, environmental and creative contexts which might be determined or influenced by functional or non-functional considerations.

  • how ideas, feelings, forms, and purposes can generate responses that address personal needs or meet external requirements, such as client expectations and any associated constraints.

The ways in which meanings, ideas and intentions relevant to textile design can be communicated include the use of:

  • figurative and non-figurative representations, stylisation, simplification, surface embellishment, constructional considerations and imaginative interpretation

  • visual and tactile elements, such as:

    • colour

    • line

    • form

    • tone

    • texture

    • shape

    • pattern

    • composition

    • decoration

    • repetition

    • scale

    • structure

    • surface

Skills

Students must demonstrate the ability to:

  • use textile design techniques and processes, appropriate to students’ personal intentions, for example:

    • weaving

    • felting

    • stitching

    • appliqué

    • construction methods

    • printing.

  • use media and materials, as appropriate to students’ personal intentions, for example:

    • inks

    • yarns

    • threads

    • fibres

    • fabrics

    • textile materials

    • digital imagery

Grading

Students will be graded from 9-1.

CHILD DEVELOPMENT

Qualification: OCR Cambridge National Level 1/2 Certificate Child Development

This is an option subject from 2016. It is made up of 50% exam and 50% assignments.

Year 9-11

There are two centre assessed units with practical task-based assessment options, as well as an exam covering topics such as: responsibilities of parenthood, contraception and reproduction, antenatal, health, delivery, postnatal checks, illnesses and child safety.

Unit 1 – Exam: Health and wellbeing for child development. Worth 50% of the grade and is 1 hour 15 minutes long.

The first unit underpins all of the other learning in this qualification.

All students will learn the essential knowledge and understanding for child development, covering:

  • Reproduction

  • Parental responsibility

  • Antenatal care

  • Birth

  • Postnatal checks

  • Care

  • Conditions for development

  • Childhood illnesses

  • Child safety

Knowledge gained would be of use for further studies in PHSE, Biology and other Child Development qualifications.

Unit 2 – Assessment: Understand the equipment and nutritional needs of children from birth to five years. Worth 25% of the grade.

In Unit 2, students will gain knowledge of:

  • Equipment needs of babies and young children

  • Factors to be considered when choosing appropriate equipment to meet all of these needs

  • Nutrition

  • Hygiene practices

  • Evaluating dietary choices

Evaluation skills are transferable skills which would be of use in further studies in most areas.

Unit 3 – Assessment: Understand the development of a child from birth to five years. Worth 25% of the grade.

In Unit 3, students will gain knowledge of, and skills in developing activities to observe development norms in children up to the age of five.

This unit will include:

  • Researching

  • Planning

  • Carrying out activities with children

  • Observing and reviewing these activities

  • Understanding of the development norms and the benefits of play in child development.

These transferable skills will support further studies in many other subjects.

Grading

Students will be graded at Level 2 Pass, Merit, Distinction or Distinction* (Pass Merit and Distinction are available at Level 1).

HOSPITALITY AND CATERING

Qualification: WJEC Level 1/2 Hospitality and Catering (Specification A)

This subject is made up of 40% exam and 60% NEA.

Employment in hospitality and catering can range from waiting staff, receptionists and catering assistants to chefs, hotel and bar managers and food technologists in food manufacturing. This course is designed for students who want to learn about this vocational sector and the potential it can offer them for their careers or further study.

Through the two units, learners will gain an overview of the hospitality and catering industry and the type of job roles that may be available to assist them in making choices about progression.

Year 9–11

Unit 1 – Exam (Online): The Hospitality and Catering Industry. This is 90 minutes long. Worth 40% of the grade.

Assessment criteria includes:

  • Understanding the environment in which hospitality and catering providers operate

    • Structure of the hospitality and catering industry

    • Job requirements

    • Working conditions of different job roles

    • Factors affecting the success of hospitality and catering providers

  • Understanding how hospitality and catering provision operates

    • Operation of the kitchen

    • Operation of front of house

    • How hospitality and catering provision meet customer requirements

  • Understanding how hospitality and catering provision meets health and safety requirements

    • Personal safety responsibilities in the workplace

    • Risks to personal safety in hospitality and catering

    • Personal safety control measures for hospitality and catering provision

  • Knowing how food can cause ill health

    • Food related causes of ill health

    • Role and responsibilities of the Environmental Health Officer (EHO)

    • Food safety legislation

    • Common types of food poisoning

    • Symptoms of food induced ill health

  • Being able to propose a hospitality and catering provision to meet specific requirements

    • Reviewing options for hospitality and catering provision

    • Recommending options for hospitality provision

 

Unit 2 – NEA: Hospitality and Catering in Action. Worth 60% of the grade.

In this unit students will look at the answers to the following areas:

  • Why should we follow storage recommendations on food products?

  • Why do chefs need to consider the nutritional needs of their clients?

  • Why should vegetarian dishes be prepared away from those containing meat?

  • Why are temperature probes used in the catering industry?

  • Why does appropriate professional attire need to be worn?

Assessment criteria includes:

  • Understanding the importance of nutrition when planning menus

    • Functions of nutrients in the human body

    • Comparing nutritional needs of specific groups

    • Characteristics of unsatisfactory nutritional intake

    • How cooking methods impact on nutritional value

  • Understanding menu planning

    • Factors to consider when proposing dishes for menus

    • How dishes on a menu address environmental issues

    • How menu dishes meet customer needs

    • Planning production of dishes for a menu

  • Being able to cook dishes

    • Techniques in preparation of products

    • Assuring quality of products to be used in food preparation

    • Techniques in cooking of products

    • Completing dishes using presentation techniques

    • Food safety practices

Grading

Students will be graded at Level 2 Pass, Merit, or Distinction or Distinction *; or Level 1 Pass.

Market Lane, Gateshead NE11 9NX, UK

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